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Ads Gone Wild: More antics in Boston February 24, 2007

Posted by Brian in advertising, Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Boston, Dr. Pepper, guerrilla marketing.
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Well, I already posted my opinions on the city of Boston’s overreaction to the Aqua Teen Hunger Force guerrilla marketing campaign that led to the city practically shutting down a few weeks ago.

However, a new advertising tactic has again agitated Boston officials.

BOSTON (AP) – Less than a month after highways and bridges were shut down during a bomb scare touched off by an advertising stunt, a new marketing scheme has led angry city officials to shut down a historic site.

A clue in a Dr Pepper promotion suggested a coin that might be worth as much as $1 million was buried in the 347-year-old Granary Burying Ground, the final resting place of John Hancock, Paul Revere, Samuel Adams and other historic figures.

After contestants showed up at the cemetery gates early Tuesday, the city closed it, concerned that it would be damaged by treasure hunters.

“It absolutely is disrespectful,” Boston Parks Commissioner Toni Pollak told The Boston Globe. “It’s an affront to the people who are buried there, our nation’s ancestors.”

OK…I have to side with Boston in this case.

Cadbury Schweppes PLC, the makers of Dr. Pepper soda, should have known better than to hide a valuable coin in a cemetery, especially one serving as the burial site to some of the founding forefathers of the United States. The company should have worked with City Hall on this one.

That being said, I also think Turner Networks/Adult Swim should have informed the cities involved in the Aqua Teen campaign of the plan before implementing it. However, I still say Boston overreacted to that one.

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1. Ads Gone Wild 3: Boston-area bank overreacts to fax promotion « Tandem with the Random - May 31, 2007

[…] the Aqua Teen Hunger Force/Lite-Brite debacle and the Cadbury promotion that went awry earlier this year, it seems the Boston area has hit the trifecta for ad-related […]


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